Meet the Author: Sally Murphy

One of the loveliest aspects of my writing life is the friends I have made along the way. This week it’s my pleasure to introduce long-time friend Sally Murphy, who recently celebrated the release of her latest book for young readers, Worse Things, an inspirational story about the things that bind us all.

Sally is a children’s author, poet, book reviewer, academic, and beach walker.  Her 52 published books include verse novels, junior fiction, picture books, historical fiction , poetry and educational titles. When she isn’t writing or reading, she can be found near water, or hanging out with her family – or at her day job, at a university.

To find out more about Sally and her books, visit her author website:  www.sallymurphy.com.au

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? That is a BIG question. I write because I have to – it’s like breathing to me. Stories and poems and words come to me demanding to be put down – and then reworked and reworked of course.  But I also write because  there are stories, sometimes, that I feel only I can tell and because I love to think I am making some small difference in the world through telling those stories.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? Persistence. It took me many years to get my first acceptance, and I still get more rejections than acceptances. Many of my manuscripts have never found the right home – and never will – and that can hurt when it happens. But a rejected manuscript is still proof that I am writing and creating, and everything I write makes me a better writer, whether it’s published or not. So  I just keep writing, and studying the craft of writing and writing some more.

You write poetry, picture books, junior fiction series and verse novels. Was it your intention to find different markets for your creative output or did it evolve naturally as an expression of who you are? Mostly I just write the thing that comes to me and then figure out what it is. I think that having a range has helped me to keep getting published, and to find different outlets for my work, but I also know it can make me hard to classify.  I have fallen into some forms of writing – for example, I didn’t see myself writing historical fiction until I stumbled across a story that fascinated me, and had to follow it. That led to my first historical picture book, Do Not Forget Australia. Once that was published, I realised that I loved researching history and crafting stories. My three subsequent historical stories were all ones publishers approached me to write, because they knew I wrote historical fiction.

How do you approach a new writing project? Walk us through your creative process. Once you have an idea, what’s the next step? Process? I’m supposed to have a process? Just kidding!  I know some people are very good at plotting and planning, but I have to confess I’m generally not. Usually an idea just comes to me, half formed – maybe just a character, or a snippet of an idea. I try to note things down, and then just see what happens. If it has wings, it will niggle away at me, and random ideas will come to me over weeks or even months until suddenly I realise there is a story there and I start writing.  Usually by this stage I have some idea where the story might be heading, but not the finer details. These evolve during the first draft, and then, once I have a draft down the hard work involves reworking and remolding, often adding strands and characters and detail. It’s a little different when I write historical fiction, which usually starts with a real event that I want to write about, followed by LOTS of research until I find a way in to telling it.

How has teaching influenced you as an author? Firstly, it is because I’m a teacher that my first ever book acceptance came about. I had been trying for years to get fiction and poetry published, when I stumbled across an educational publisher looking for proposals for classroom resources books. I sent in a proposal and it was accepted. I went on to write several more books for that publisher (Ready Ed Publications) and they are still in print, over 20 years later. Having that first acceptance gave me the courage to keep writing and submitting.  I’ve also had lots of other titles published for the educational market.

Having said that, when I write fiction and poetry I try not to wear my teacher hat. I want my work to reach readers first and foremost as readers rather than as students.

What are you working on at the moment? A few things. Some research for a possible historical, and an idea for a new verse novel which hit me last week and won’t leave me alone. I also have two junior novels to revise, one a verse novel and one prose. They both need a lot of work.

What do you hope readers will take away from your stories? Hope. I want a reader to finish my story smiling – even if it has been a sad or challenging story. I always work to leave them with some sense of hope, that things can be better.

Is there any area of writing that you still find challenging? Description. I have something called aphantasia – although I didn’t know it had a name till a few years ago. This means that I don’t imagine in pictures – except when I’m asleep. So, when I try to imagine what a scene looks like, I draw a blank. I can tell you what it feels like, sounds like etc, but not the visuals.  So I really have to work on visual description. Interestingly, I know of several other writers with the same condition.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? Getting published and thus seeing my books in the hands (and hearts) of readers.

—the worst? Rejection.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? Believe in myself more. Even after 50 books I still feel like a fraud.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? The importance of a good editor.

What’s the best advice you were ever given? Be yourself – as an individual and as a writer, you need to do what is true to who you are.

What’s your top tip for aspiring authors? Read. A lot.

How important is social media to you as an author? Very. I have lived in rural areas for most of my writing career and now divide myself between Perth and the South West. Social media allows me to share my writing and my writing life far and wide, and to interact with readers.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? I don’t ever run out of ideas, but I do struggle to write at times of crisis in my life. I used to try to force it, but now I am kinder to myself. Instead of setting word targets, I sometimes know I have to just let myself do other things. Recently, with Covid 19 and a death in my family, I found myself taking long beach walks, and doing a lot of gardening. And then, because I’d just left it, a story idea came along and bit me on the nose.

How do you deal with rejection? I can be angry or feel hurt – rejections aren’t personal, but they feel like they are. But rationally, I know that publishers actually want what I do – to publish good books. SO if my book isn’t right for a publisher, it either needs revising, or it needs to be on a different desk – or a combination of both. I try to take a step back from the manuscript, look at with fresh eyes, and decide which of those things is needed.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Eclectic. Emotional. Effervescent.

Now for a little light relief – If you were going to be stuck in a stalled lift for several hours who would you choose to share the experience with you and why? Light relief? I’m claustrophobic, so being stuck in a lift is almost my worst nightmare. So, I would choose my husband, because he is very steady.

BOOK BYTE

Worse Things

Sally Murphy

Illustrated by Sarah Davis

After a devastating football injury, Blake struggles to cope with life on the sideline. Jolene, a gifted but conflicted hockey player, wants nothing more than for her dad to come home. And soccer-loving refugee, Amed, wants to belong. On the surface, it seems they have nothing in common. Except sport. A touching and inspirational story about the things that bind us all.

Publisher’s Webpage: https://www.walkerbooks.com.au/Books/Worse-Things-9781760651657

Sales site:  https://www.booktopia.com.au/worse-things-sally-murphy/book/9781760651657.html  (or any other online bookshop you want to link to)

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Author: Alison Booth

It’s my pleasure this week to introduce you to academic and author Alison Booth, whose work has been described as ‘evocative, insightful and thought-provoking’

ALISON’S TOP TIPS FOR WRITERS: Keep at it. Don’t give up. Have faith in yourself and remember that writing a novel requires a very long apprenticeship. Make sure you have a day job or some other income source because only rarely can writers make a living from writing alone.

Alison Booth was born in Melbourne and brought up in Sydney. She spent over two decades studying, living and working in the UK before returning to Australia some fifteen years ago.

Her debut novel, Stillwater Creek, was Highly Commended in the 2011 ACT Book of the Year Award, and afterwards published in Reader’s Digest Select Editions in Asia and in Europe. Her subsequent novels were The Indigo Sky (2011), A Distant Land (2012), and A Perfect Marriage (2018).

Alison has had a number of residencies at Varuna, The Writers’ House, following on from her initial award, and she is active on social media (Twitter and Facebook). Alison loves doing radio and other interviews, and also loves hearing from readers. Visit her website at https://www.alisonbooth.net

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write?  I write because I’m driven to, because it helps me make sense of the world. And because the act of writing involves so much concentration that I escape from myself, and when I emerge from that state I view my day-to-day life more calmly.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer?  I’d still be doing my other work, which is being an academic economist. And in addition to that I might be painting, which I love though I’m not very good at it.

 What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? Finding an agent for my first book.

 How involved have you been in the development of your books?  I leave the development to the publisher, apart from the cover. I love seeing the way the cover evolves. The design of my latest book, The Philosopher’s Daughters, took me by surprise because the wonderful Emily Caudelle got the cover exactly right at her very first draft.

 What’s the best aspect of your writing life?  The escape into another world. The joy when the writing is going well and the surprise when things emerge from my subconscious that I hadn’t known were there.

—the worst? Those days when what I’ve written seems like utter garbage and I lose faith in myself. I think we all get those days and we have to guard against them.

 What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? Maybe do a creative writing course.

 What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? I’m very glad I wasn’t told much because it’s good not to be put off when you’re driven to do something!

 What’s the best writing advice you were ever given? Read widely.

 How important is social media to you as an author? Writers need solitude and many find engagement with social media a shock. But social media provide a useful way of keeping in touch with other writers and what’s going on in the industry. What’s more, publishers insist upon it for book promotion.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? I haven’t experienced writer’s block yet.

 How do you deal with rejection? With difficulty, though I did have some training for it: being an academic in my field involves frequent rejection of papers from journals and one learns to toughen up. The important thing is to remember that opinions about fiction are subjective. What one person loves another will hate. Put the rejection letter aside for a few days then return to it later, to see if there’s anything of substance in it you can take on board. Remember also that sometimes a book is rejected because the reader hasn’t got beyond the first chapter, so you might want to rethink that. And then send the book off to another publisher.

 In three words, how would you describe your writing? That’s a hard question to answer as it requires detachment on my part. Instead I will borrow the words that author Karen Viggers used to describe The Philosopher’s Daughters: ‘evocative, insightful, thought-provoking’.

 What do you hope readers will take away from your stories? I hope readers get pleasure from my novels. I hope they enjoy the journeys the books take them on and are interested in the way the plot enhances character development, which is basically what my work is about.

What do you read for enjoyment? Favourite books/authors?  I have a great many favourites. Patrick White, Kate Grenville, Evie Wyld, Rose Tremain and Anne Tyler are particularly wonderful. Recently I’ve discovered Khaled Housseni’s work and I’m looking forward to reading all of his novels.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? Rose Tremain and Anne Tyler spring to mind. I’d like to ask Rose Tremain how she has managed to find such variety in her plots and Anne Tyler if she writes a long draft initially and then pares it back to the exquisite and parsimonious prose that characterises her work.

BOOK BYTE

The Philosopher’s Daughters

Alison Booth

 

 

]A tale of two very different sisters whose 1890s voyage from London into remote outback Australia becomes a journey of self-discovery, set against a landscape of wild beauty and savage dispossession. London in 1891: Harriet Cameron is a talented young artist whose mother died when she was barely five. She and her beloved sister Sarah were brought up by their father, radical thinker James Cameron. After adventurer Henry Vincent arrives on the scene, the sisters’ lives are changed forever. Sarah, the beauty of the family, marries Henry and embarks on a voyage to Australia. Harriet, intensely missing Sarah, must decide whether to help her father with his life’s work or to devote herself to painting. When James Cameron dies unexpectedly, Harriet is overwhelmed by grief. Seeking distraction, she follows Sarah to Australia, and afterwards into the outback, where she is alienated by the casual violence and great injustices of outback life. Her rejuvenation begins with her friendship with an Aboriginal stockman and her growing love for the landscape. But this fragile happiness is soon threatened by murders at a nearby cattle station and by a menacing station hand who is seeking revenge.

Buy the book here.

Meet the Author: Leisl Leighton

My guest this week is award-winning author Leisl Leighton, who describes her work as ’emotional, pacey and suspenseful’. Read on to find out what Leisl wishes she’d been told before she became a writer and what she’d do differently if she were starting out now.

Leisl is a tall redhead with an overly large imagination. As a child, she identified strongly with Anne of Green Gables, and like Anne, is a voracious reader and born performer. It came as no surprise when she did a double major in English Literature and Drama for her BA and Dip Ed, then went on to a career as a performer, script writer, script doctor, stage manager and musical director for cabaret and theatre restaurants.

After starting a family, Leisl stopped performing and began writing the stories plaguing her dreams. She is addicted to the Syfy channel, her shelves are full of fantasy, paranormal, Sci-fi and romance books and DVDs, she sometimes sings in a choir, has worked as a swim teacher, loves to ski and horse ride, and was president of Romance Writers of Australia from 2014-2017. She now has a Graduate Diploma in Publishing and Communications (Advanced), continues to write novels and also helps other writers make their manuscripts shine with her manuscript assessing and mentoring services.

Leisl is the author of the paranormal Pack Bound Series, romantic suspense novels, Dangerous Echoes (Book 1 in the Echo Springs Series), Climbing Fear and Blazing Fear (Books 1& 2 in the CoalCliff Stud Series.) Most recently, she has been a finalist in the 2019 RUBY Awards (for Moon Bound) and a finalist in the 2019 ARRA Awards (for Climbing Fear).

You can catch up with Leisl at: www.leislleighton.comFacebook, Goodreads and on Twitter @LeislLeighton

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I write because I have to. I’ve always been a creative person – acting, singing, performing, writing scripts, musical direction etc – but after kids, these were much harder to do in a way that satisfied my creative needs. I turned fully to writing novels and haven’t looked back. If I don’t write, I don’t feel right.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer? Acting, singing, performing, writing scripts, musical direction and/or teaching.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? Realising that just because writing is something you do by yourself, it doesn’t mean you have to do it alone. It wasn’t until I embraced a writing community and opened myself up to learning from and sharing with them, that I started to learn what I truly needed to do to become published. And they also helped to keep up my spirits and persist – because alongside improving your craft, persistence is a major factor in getting published.

How involved have you been in the development of your books? If you mean, have they all come from me and only me, no. They start off with an idea or a character and then I start to write and see where that takes me, letting the characters speak for themselves. Then I also run ideas and workshop with trusted writing friends and with my agent who help me to solidify the tricky bits and head me in the right direction. Then of course, my editors help to polish and refine my ideas. So, while probably 75% of it is me, the rest is done with help by my community of writing pals and the professional people in my life.

Then there was the Echo Springs series which came from an idea from my editor at the time who got together myself and three other authors to write a continuity. She had the base idea and then myself and the other three authors – Daniel deLorne, Shannon Stein and TJ Hamilton – workshopped the series and our ideas together then went away and wrote our individual story, then with the editor to make sure they all hung together as a cohesive whole. That was a really amazing project to have been a part of and I learned so much.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? Losing myself in the world of my characters. It can be exhilarating.

—the worst? Having to constantly work at making others respect the fact I am a writer and that I’m not just home doing whatever and can drop what I’m doing and come to do whatever they want to do. It is a constant effort to have to make family and friends respect my working day.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? Find a writing group to be a part of and join RWA right away (or some other writing organisation to suit my genre). I floundered for years on my own before doing those things and it wasn’t until I did join writing communities that I started to make the improvements and build the networks that led to me getting published. Also, my writing friends are some of the best people in my life.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? Getting that first contract is amazing, but it doesn’t mean it’s all roses from there. There’s an increase in the hard work to come and that the ebbs and flows in the publishing industry mean that you can never be ‘secure’ – but that’s normal and has nothing to do with you. You just need to keep getting out there and trying and writing the best you can if you want the next step to be forward and not backwards. That and start building an author profile immediately – SM may be a burden at times but it can also be a joy and it certainly helps you to connect with authors and readers and stay informed and helps with publicity and marketing which are increasingly important for an author to take command over whether traditionally published or self-published.

What’s the best writing advice you were ever given? Join RWA, enter contests, get a critique partner, volunteer, go to the conferences, improve your craft and persevere.

What’s your top tip for aspiring authors? All of the above, but also make sure you get your work critiqued by someone who isn’t just a writing buddy or family member. That’s why going in contests can be so invaluable because you often get really great feedback that can help you improve. You can also find people who do author mentoring and manuscript assessments.

How important is social media to you as an author? Very. See my above comment about building an author profile.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? Not really. There are times when I know what I’m writing isn’t working and I can feel a bit stymied, but that’s when I workshop with my writing friends to help me break through that. Even then, I don’t stop writing. I believe that getting something on the page that I can fix is better than getting nothing down – you can’t fix what’s not there.

How do you deal with rejection? I let myself feel the sting of it but then remind myself that I’m here because I love writing and I concentrate on that and move on. If there is advice in the rejection about my work, I take that onboard, workshop it with writing friends and keep going. I also know that a rejection is not always an indictment on my work – there are so many factors that go into a ‘no’ that have nothing to do with if my novel is good or not. So, remembering that helps me not take it too personally. Also, wailing to my writing friends helps – they’ve all been in the same position and empathise in a way that’s meaningful but then also buck me up.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Emotional. Pacey. Suspenseful.

What do you hope readers will take away from your stories? A sense that family can be made up of anyone who cares for you and you care for and that asking for help can be a person’s greatest strength. And also, that love is something we should all aspire to.

What do you read for enjoyment? Favourite books/authors?  I love reading what I write – paranormal and romantic suspense. I also love reading fantasy and historic romance. My favourite authors are Nalini Singh, Sherrilyn Kenyon, JD Robb/Nora Roberts, Raymond E. Feist, Anne McCaffrey, Anne Gracie, Mary Balogh, Amanda Quick, Julia Quinn (and many, many more!)

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? Probably Nora Roberts. I would like to ask her about balancing family life with writing life. Also, how to balance all the necessary business side of writing with the creative side and still living a life that includes fun time doing things that you love with family and friends.

BOOK BYTE

Blazing Fear

Leisl Leighton

Fire stole his past – now it is threatening to burn everything, and everyone, he loves. All over again…

Flynn Findlay likes everyone to think he’s in control, but the death of his wife during the bushfires six years ago changed everything. Now, even though it feels like a betrayal, Flynn can’t seem to escape his growing feelings for the beautiful new doctor in town. He’s never felt as truly alive as when he is with Prita – even his fear of fire doesn’t seem as bad.

Dr Prita Brennan is ready for a fresh start in Wilson’s Bend with her adoptive son, far from her overprotective family. It would be perfect, except some of the locals don’t like the changes she’s making to the practice. One of them is even making harassing calls. The handsome local horse stud owner, Flynn, is a further complication she doesn’t need right now.

But when harassment escalates to arson, to save the horse stud and their children, Flynn and Prita must work together to figure out who is after her – and why they are trying to burn to the ground everything she touches.

Buy Links for Blazing Fear

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2pGOWyK

Apple Books: https://apple.co/2Nj5rtY

Kobo: http://bit.ly/34FjLTt

Google Play: http://bit.ly/34saJcf

Romance.com.au: http://bit.ly/36y19GC

 

Amazon

Apple Books

Kobo

Google Play

Romance.com.au

 

Meet the Author: Christine Bell

Christine’s top tip for aspiring authors: Even when you’re not getting published keep writing. Elizabeth Jolley did that over twenty years of rejection and then when one book got published, the others all lined up behind and, in short time, she seemed prolific.

Christine Bell is a Melbourne fiction writer. Her debut historical novel No Small Shame was published by Ventura Press (Impact) this month. In October 2019, Christine was awarded the inaugural Historical Novel Society Australasia (HNSA) Colleen McCullough Residency for an Established Writer. She is a Varuna fellow and holds a Master of Creative Writing (RMIT). Christine has had 35 short fiction works published for children. No Small Shame is her first adult novel.

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I write because I love the thrill of creating characters and seeing people, places, events coming to life on the page that didn’t exist before. Then I write to discover why my characters make certain choices, what influences them and to see how they respond to both the world and shifting circumstances.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer? I’d perhaps be a teacher or a librarian. I taught ESL to Chinese English Major students for a term at a Chinese university and loved it. I also taught creative writing classes for a couple of terms to adult students and loved that too. But being a writer, I couldn’t wait to get back to work on my story.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? Getting a novel published has proven far more elusive than getting my children’s fiction published. Two YA novels went to various acquisitions meetings, but didn’t make it through. Really though, I think my biggest obstacle was probably my own fear and self-doubt. I took a long time to send No Small Shame out into the world. I loved it and couldn’t bear to let it go.

How involved have you been in the development of your book? Did you have input into the cover? Ventura Press have been very inclusive throughout every stage, from discussions on the cover design and editorial process to changing the original title. I really appreciated that they took up some of my suggestions. I trusted them implicitly and knew that, if they did not agree with any, they knew the market and readers far better than me. My input into the cover design was to suggest the type of cover images I liked and then to say which design I liked best during concept development. Happily, we all picked the same as our favourite which was the one developed into the final cover art on the book.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? I love those moments when I’m so engrossed in writing a scene that my fingers fly across the keyboard. It still delights me to see an idea become real on the page, a new character or event come to life that an hour ago did not exist. Also I love those times when a gnarly scene I’ve been wrestling develops into a crucial and poignant moment in the book. I have to say though that the very best moment was when I finally held No Small Shame, the book, in my hands!

—the worst? Self doubt. The fear that I’m fooling myself. Will anyone want to read my book? That fear can be paralysing on occasions, but then I have to give myself a good prod and get back to work.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? I’d trust myself to write the book I always wanted to write, even if it was big and scary and might never be published.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? If you want to write novels, write novels. Don’t worry whether you’re good enough or if it will ever get published.

What’s the best advice you were ever given? Make your similes work for your story. Match them to your work. For example: In No Small Shame, there’s a scene where Mary’s husband is having a nightmare and thrashing about in the bed. In the original scene I wrote it using a simile along the lines that Mary was drowning in a churning sea, but when I went to rework it, I knew it needed to be connected more immediately to their world and setting, and so it became about the timbers shifting in a coal mine and the roof beginning to cave in.

How important is social media to you as an author? At one time, I looked upon it as a necessary evil. A time sucker that took me away from writing. But then as I began to make connections and friendships with writers whom I’d never met and couldn’t hope to meet, my attitude changed to one of gratitude. Plus the incredible, generous response of the online writing community to authors who’ve had launches and events cancelled during this Covid-19 crisis has proven beyond doubt how valuable the connections you make through social media can be. Plus you’re never working alone in a bubble or isolated.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? Generally, I don’t suffer from writer’s block. I can experience chronic bouts of procrastination, when I consciously avoid beginning a scene, telling myself I need to do more research, think about it more etc. Ultimately, I have to make myself sit down and just write. I tell myself, I just need to get the bare bones down. It almost always works, then I’m left wondering why I put it off so long!

How do you deal with rejection? Usually I give myself 24 hours to mope, then send it out again. I’ve always been pretty resilient, except for one brief patch in 2018 when I lost confidence in the direction of my work-in-progress, then received two particularly disappointing rejections in one week. For the first time, I shut my office door, saying, I don’t think I can do this anymore. It took some weeks for me to realise that I’d become so obsessed with writing and getting published, I’d forgotten to take time out for other things. For fun! I gave myself a long Christmas break and took up learning to play the piano and mastering photography with a mirrorless camera. I began the New Year somewhat renewed and reinspired for work-in-progress, especially after I did a hugely inspirational masterclass with Antoni Jach.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Authentic, compelling, gritty.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? This answer would change for me on any given day, depending on what I was reading or writing. Today, I’d nominate Ruth Park. She wrote with such raw honesty and her characters, such as the Darcy family in Harp in the South, bore a familiarity to the O’Donnells in No Small Shame. They also faced poverty and prejudice, along with the daily struggle to break free of their circumstances. I think Park with her Irish migrant background would have many more tales she could tell. With my Irish, Scottish heritage, I’d be keen to listen.

BOOK BYTE

No Small Shame

Christine Bell

Australia, 1914. The world is erupting in war. Jobs are scarce and immigrants unwelcome. For young Catholic Mary O’Donnell, this is not the new life she imagined. When one foolish night of passion leads to an unexpected pregnancy and a loveless marriage, Mary’s reluctant husband Liam escapes to the trenches. With her overbearing mother attempting to control her every decision, Mary flees to Melbourne determined to build a life for herself and her child. There, she forms an unlikely friendship with Protestant army reject Tom Robbins. But as a shattering betrayal is revealed, Mary must make an impossible choice. Does she embrace the path fate has set for her, or follow the one she longs to take? From the harshness of a pit village in Scotland to the upheaval of wartime Australia, No Small Shame tells the moving story of love and duty, loyalty and betrayal, and confronting the past before you can seek a future.

Purchase links:

Readings: https://www.readings.com.au/products/30505748/no-small-shame

Dymocks: https://www.dymocks.com.au/book/no-small-shame-by-christine-bell-9781920727901

Booktopia: https://www.booktopia.com.au/no-small-shame-christine bell/book/9781920727901.html

Ebook: Amazon: https://www.amazon.com.au/No-Small-Shame-choice-forever-ebook/dp/B07WQYNC2G

Social media links:

Website:              https://christinebell.com.au

Twitter:                https://twitter.com/chrisbellwrites

Facebook:            https://www.facebook.com/chris.bell.77377

Instagram:           https://www.instagram.com/christinembell

 

 

Meet the Author: Kirsten Krauth

Kirsten’s top tip for aspiring authors: Find your unique style and don’t be afraid to stick with it.

Kirsten Krauth is an author and arts journalist who lives in Castlemaine, Australia. Her writing has been published in the Guardian, Saturday Paper, Monthly, Age/SMH and Overland. She’s inspired by photography, pop and punk, film, other writers and growing up in the ’80s. Almost a Mirror was shortlisted for the Penguin Literary Prize and her first novel is just_a_girl. For more on the book visit @almost.a.mirror on Instagram or search out Almost a Mirror on YouTube, Spotify and Apple Music to hear the playlist.

Find out more about Kirsten here.

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I don’t feel like I have a choice! I have written creatively since I was four years old. When I’m working on a writing project, I feel challenged, content, curious. When researching, I learn a lot about new topics and I like to attempt to work out why people do the things they do. It also helps me deal with experiences that have lodged inside that I need to bring out to the open to contemplate.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer? I’ve always dreamt of being a musician which is probably why I write about music so much. A dancer. An actor. Something expressive.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? I found it hard to get an agent at first until I met the wonderful Jo Butler. Some of the agent comments along the way were pretty tough. But as this was my second novel, I knew what feedback to take on and what to discard. I was lucky this time in that it was a dream run in terms of getting a publisher. Transit Lounge sought the book out and being shortlisted for the Penguin Literary Prize gave it a boost.

How involved have you been in the development of your book? Did you have input into the cover? Yes, I felt completely involved. The designer chosen for the cover was the person I would have picked. Josh Durham. He’s also a friend in Castlemaine so that was a nice coincidence. I’m a very visual person and as the book is partly about photography I was keen to have a say. Josh and I and Transit share the same aesthetic so it worked out beautifully.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? The freedom to work from home, the collaboration, the immersion in ideas, the chance to meet other writers and artists.

—the worst? At the moment, the uncertainty of publishing a book on 1 April in this climate and the cancellation of all my launches and festival gigs.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? It took me a long time to start writing fiction as I began as an editor and arts journalist. I wish I’d started writing novels when I was in my teens – I dreamed about it for a few decades before I did it.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? To choose a handful of people more experienced than you, who you admire as writers, and take their feedback seriously (rather than a broad spectrum of opinion that can be confusing when you’re starting out).

What’s the best advice you were ever given? Richard Flanagan said not to consciously write the deep and meaningful in, the erotic, the humour, the sadness – to just observe and let the reader do this themselves. This informs every aspect of my writing now.

How important is social media to you as an author? At the moment it is a lifeline in these current strange times. I’ve set up a FB group called Writers Go Forth to help authors whose books were due to be launched in 2020. It’s got 1400 members in a week! Building that kind of community is important to me.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? No, I don’t. My creative writing time is so precious I get on with it. I always write a first draft in fragments. I got a great tip for starting off if you’re stuck. Think of: 1. A location 2. A character 3. An emotion. Eg A concert, Nick Cave, Rage – this is in my book Almost a Mirror. I find I can start writing from that place immediately.

How do you deal with rejection? It gets easier as you go along. But then again as you keep writing novels more seems to ride on them! I tend to receive the rejection, feel upset on the day, put it aside, wake up the next day with a new idea and return to the rejection a fair way down the track. I don’t dwell on it.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Punchy. Stylistic. Empathetic.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? Oh wow! It would be Patti Smith. I admire her strength and resilience and the power she creates with images and words – and music. I’d like to know how she had the courage to always be herself and how she manages to have such an emotional impact on the reader and audience at gigs.

BOOK BYTE

Almost a Mirror

Kirsten Krauth

 

 

Like fireflies to the light, Mona, Benny and Jimmy are drawn
into the elegantly wasted orbit of the Crystal Ballroom
and the post-punk scene of 80s Melbourne, a world that
includes Nick Cave and Dodge, a photographer pushing
his art to the edge.
With precision and richness Kirsten Krauth hauntingly
evokes the power of music to infuse our lives, while diving
deep into loss, beauty, innocence and agency. Filled with
unforgettable characters, the novel is above all about the
shapes that love can take and the many ways we express
tenderness throughout a lifetime.
As it moves between the Blue Mountains and Melbourne,
Sydney and Castlemaine, Almost a Mirror reflects on the
healing power of creativity and the everyday sacredness of
family and friendship in the face of unexpected tragedy.

Buy the book here.

 

Meet the Author: Subhash Jaireth

Subhash’s top tip for aspiring authors: Don’t be afraid to experiment; to experiment not for the sake for experimenting but for finding new ways of storytelling. It is always easy to follow the formula which works for you; be ready to break the formula.

Subhash Jaireth was born in Punjab, India. Between 1969 and 1978 he spent nine years in Russia studying geology and Russian literature. In 1986 he migrated to Australia. He has published poetry in Hindi, English and Russian. His published works include Yashodhara: Six Seasons Without You (Wild Peony, 2003), Unfinished Poems for Your Violin (Penguin Australia, 1996), Golee Lagne Se Pahle (Before the Bullet Hit Me) (Vani Prakashan, 1994), To Silence: Three Autobiographies (Puncher & Wattmann, 2011), After Love (Transit Lounge, 2012), Moments (Puncher & Wattmann, 2014) and Incantations (Recent Work Press, 2016). A Catalan translation of the novel After Love was published in October 2018 in Valencia. He has also published English translations of Russian, Japanese and Persian poetry, and has translated poems of Indigenous Australian poets into Hindi.

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I write for aesthetic pleasure: the pleasure for my readers and for me. But most of all I write to learn about the world unknown to me. Writing provides me a chance to explore, examine and understand.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer? I am a geologist. For over forty years I have researched and taught geology. I am pretty sure instead of novels, short stories and poetry I would have written imaginatively about the planet Earth, its evolution and well-being.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? To convince mainstream publishers to take on books that don’t easily fit in the straitjacket of known genres. Perhaps that is why I value small presses like Transit Lounge, Puncher & Wattmann, and Recent Work Press who are ready to take risks.

How involved have you been in the development of your books? Do you have input into the covers? I trust my publishers and editors and we often reach consensus that works for the book.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? Reading, translating and conversing with people.

—the worst? Inability to find empathetic readers who can read early drafts and talk about it. Dialogues like these are immensely useful. To write in complete isolation is impossible.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? To travel more and to learn more languages.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? Not to lose focus; not to procrastinate; not to get lost in endless research for the book.

What’s the best advice you were ever given? Read, read, and read.

How important is social media to you as an author? It’s important for creating a community of writers and readers. A book becomes a book only when it is read. Social media can help open new doors.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? Not really. The main obstacle is to find time to work on new ideas and projects. Perhaps that is why I prefer to work on more than one project at the same time.

How do you deal with rejection? Rejections bring disappointment and frustration. Solace comes from talking to people who know my work; their feedback helps me to remain focused on my project.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Poetic, meditative and multi-voiced.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? Russian writer and poet, Marina Tsvetaeva. I am inspired by her tenacity and courage to keep on writing poems and plays overcoming adversities, personal and historical. I would also love to meet German writer and poet WG Sebald. I love his books, his narrative voice, poetic and melancholic. Like a Persian carpet weaver, he can weave threads of memories and landscape together: intricate and vibrant.

BOOK BYTE

‘It starts to rain as I step out of my hotel ….’ So begins
Subhash Jaireth’s striking collection of essays on
the writers, and their writing, that have enriched his
own life. The works of Franz Kafka, Marina Tsvetaeva,
Mikhail Bulgakov, Paul Celan, Hiromi Ito, Dutch
philosopher Baruch Spinoza and others ignite in him
the urge to travel (both physically and in spirit), almost
like a pilgrim, to the places where such writers were
born or died or wrote. In each essay a new emotional
plane is reached revealing enticing connections. As
a novelist, poet, essayist and translator born into a
multilingual environment, Jaireth truly understands
the power of words across languages and their integral
connections to life of the body and the spirit. Drawing
on years of research, translation and travel Spinoza’s
Overcoat – and its illuminations of loss, mortality and
the reverie of writing – will linger with readers.

The book is available here.

 

Meet the Author: Catherine de Saint Phalle

Catherine’s top writing tip: Be yourself in every way. Absolute honesty with oneself is my only tip. Does a mole lie to himself? Does a dog? Even if a dog tries to pull one over his human companion, like pretending he or she hasn’t eaten for weeks when they’ve just had their breakfast, you can see they’re whole. They do not slip out of themselves; they’re holding their lie like a bone in their mouth. It sounds childish to say ‘be true to yourself’ but it’s the only tip I have. Anyway, I think it’s none of my business to advise anyone. Maybe a prime liar could be a fantastic writer. I’ve just explained what works for me.

Catherine de Saint Phalle was born in London and was immediately taken back to Paris by her parents, where an English woman brought her up until she was eight. Her childhood was spent between Paris and Sussex, England. She started writing at seven. She did a modest year of university. Her way of learning was reading compulsively and writing; academia was not her element. She married and moved to the South of France in Provence where she lived till 1998 and had two subsequent relationships. She has the religion of friendship like her mother Poum. For a living, she’s been a Jack of all trades, translating, gardening, French lessons, cleaning etc. She has had nine books published: five in France with Actes Sud and Buchet-Chastel and two of her radio plays were broadcast by France Culture. She left France in 2003 to live in Australia and that’s the best decision she’s ever made. She’s the proud possessor of an Australian passport since 2008. She is now single, lives with her dog and it quite baffled at how happy she is.

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write?  Throughout my life I’ve seen some of my dearest friends suffer in their effort to discover what they wanted to do in life – talented, inspired people who could not find their voice. I have written since the age of seven. I don’t think I can find a reason for writing. Writing is like breathing. If I don’t, everything becomes constricted and dark.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer? I think I would probably be learning about essential oils or naturopathy. My grandmother was interested in herbs and the people in the village came to her when they were sick. She died in 1943, so I never met her. But I feel close to her all the same. She knew the first French naturopath Paul Carton – long before natural remedies became the fashion. She also knew about graphology. Maybe I’d be a gardener, and then I could read and write for myself even if no one ever read me.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? It was changing countries. Five of my books had been published in France and my two radio plays had been broadcast. When I came to Australia, I couldn’t find a publisher. I stayed more than 10 years like that. I got a few articles out in the Big Issue thanks to Rochelle Siemienovicz and Martin Hugues, but that was all. I wrote all kinds of things, short stories, a play, a novel, nothing came up for air. I felt I was living in my drawer. I think I was just undergoing a process of transformation. Going from the French world to the English was part of it of course. But it was more than that. In Jung’s preface to Richard Wilhem’s translation of the IChing, he says that Wilhem became Chinese in his soul and, when at the end of his life he returned to Germany, he died. I think that pouring oneself in another container can be very hard. I didn’t realise this at the time of course.

I wrote my first proper novel at 17, then several others and was not published in France until I was well into my thirties. The main obstacle was self-belief. I never had much of that. But if you have too much, it can be a problem too. It’s tricky.

How involved have you been in the development of your book? Did you have input into the cover? No. In my experience, that’s the publishers’ purview. The font, the paper, etc is all their domain. Of course, if a cover made you physically sick, they would not leave you in pain. I’m lucky, I have an intelligent, considerate publisher, but he’s also very good at what he does and I trust him. As for the editing, he has a marvellous editor called Penelope Goodes and she helped me immensely to stay with the heart of the story.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? When I can write. That’s the purest joy. One is no longer in exile.

—the worst? When I can’t. When what is right there stays hidden in the moist earth – or when life is scary and intervenes.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? I don’t know. I feel like a mole. For me writing is being in darkness, in the moist earth, digging towards the light, moving forward blindly, softly or sitting there in buried silence and trusting to find my way somehow.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? Nothing. It’s a private matter, a personal endeavour. I even hate yoga, because the teacher whispers: You are calm, you are detached, you are this, you are that … I can’t bear it. I hate having a voice in my head. It obscures the other one, the feeble, tiny, half-smothered one I’m trying to hear. I know yoga is brilliant and would probably do me a world of good, but I’d rather strangle myself with my own cardigan than go to a yoga class.

 What’s the best advice you were ever given? Never take anything for granted. And listen.

How important is social media to you as an author? Well, emails, messaging, Facebook are great tools. Didn’t EM Forster have “Only connect…” written on his tombstone?

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? It’s the most awful thing. I have encountered it a few times in my life, once for a whole month. It feels as if the air were slowly being taken away from my lungs and I become more and more anxious – a tiger might as well be prowling around the room. I’m grounded when I write. I feel whole and useful, even when I’m writing in my notebook about a lady and her basket on the tram, about a streetlight, about the slope of someone’s shoulders … I feel I am saving them in some invisible, mysterious way. It’s ridiculous I know, but that’s how it is.

How do you deal with rejection? Because writing is such an inner thing, it feels like a jolt from above (again the mole), as if my mole hill had been squashed. It’s a tightening, a call to dig deeper. There’s a pinch of course, like all rejection. But it doesn’t make me lose heart entirely.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Oh dear, I’m incapable of describing my own writing. Sorry, it’s like trying to see what you look like from behind. It’s an inner endeavour, it comes from another world, the world of the unconscious where all our roots meet. So I have no idea at all.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? I think it would be Helen Garner. I always like to know what she feels about anything, not only writing. In fact, hearing her talk about her toothbrush would be most illuminating.

BOOK BYTE

The Sea & Us

Catherine de Saint Phalle

From the Stella shortlisted author of Poum and Alexandre, this is a heartwarming novel about longing, absence and the people we unexpectedly come to love.
After many years spent living in Seoul, a young man called Harold
drifts back to Australia and rents a room above a fish and chip shop
called The Sea & Us. Who he meets and what he experiences there
propels him to question his own yearnings and failings, and to fight for
meaning and a sense of place that can only be reached by facing what
is lost.
By turns electric, tender, and hopeful, The Sea & Us is a gem of literary
imagination. Catherine de Saint Phalle brilliantly captures disparate
characters and their common human desire for community and
connection. Long after the last page closes, ‘we can hear the bell
tinkle. Someone wants some fish and chips.’

The book is available here.

 

 

Meet the Author: Stephanie Ward

Stephanie’s top tip for aspiring authors: Believe. If you can’t believe in yourself (because so many of us writers are plagued with self-doubt), believe in your story. Or believe in your characters. They deserve to be heard.

Stephanie Ward is the author of Arabella and the Magic Pencil, illustrated by Shaney Hyde, published by EK Books in September 2019. Her next picture book is due for release in 2020, but it’s all under wraps at the moment so stay tuned for details! After many years in marketing, Stephanie now spends her time writing sweet, silly and sidesplitting stories for children. Too old to blame it on youth, she still hasn’t settled down and spends her spare time traveling. At present, she can be found in London, England with her husband and young son.

To find out more about Stephanie and her writing, visit her website: www.stephaniemward.com

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I write because I have stories to tell and I want to tell them my way. I love playing with words and letting ideas take me into uncharted territory.

How has your childhood influenced you as a children’s author? Both Arabella and the Magic Pencil and my forthcoming picture book (top secret for now) are based on things I did in my childhood. The freedom I had then to imagine, create and try new things without any ulterior motive or goal set a wonderful precedent for allowing time for exploration in my writing life.

How much inspiration do you draw from your own family life? Do you test your early drafts on family members? My seven-year-old son and his friends are an unending source of inspiration. From their raw view of the world to the kooky words they use and their radical emotional swings, it’s hilarious and heartbreaking all at once.

I do force my son and husband to listen to my stories, but it doesn’t always end well. It’s like living with critique partners whose feedback you never use. Awkward.

Arabella’s Magic Pencil is a delightful take on sibling rivalry. It’s full of whimsy and a wonderful use of language. I found myself smiling as I turned each page. How did this story come about and what do you hope readers will take away from it? Thank you for your kind words. I first wrote this story in Year 8 as an assignment for English class. At the time, I was 13 years old and had recently become a big sister, again. The new addition to our family was a little brother who was then almost two years old. I’m sure I was channeling my annoyance at having a toddler messing up all of my important teenage stuff when I decided to write about a girl who could draw anything she wanted and erase things she didn’t.

I hope the story resonates with families who are welcoming a new child. It’s hard for children to identify what they are feeling about a new sibling, especially when emotions can change frequently. I wanted to write a story about all of those feelings.

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? Figuring out the publishing industry – who is open to submissions, what they want, who to pitch, how to submit, and on and on ad infinitum – is a full-time challenge.

How involved have you been in the development of your book? Did you have input into the illustrations? Once the contract was signed, I was out of the picture while the wonderful artist Shaney Hyde worked her magic. I didn’t have input, but I got a couple of sneak peeks along the way and I was truly blown away by the end result. Maybe Shaney has a magic pencil?

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? Being able to write stories that are swirling around in my imagination and then share them with children who totally get it is amazing.

—the worst? Not being able to write down coherently what is so clearly the best story idea in my head is immensely frustrating.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? I wouldn’t worry about what everyone else is doing or how they did it and simply forge my own writing path.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? Being an author is more than just writing in pyjamas, so get ready.

What’s the best advice you were ever given? Forget about anyone who doesn’t get what you are trying to do with your story, even if they are a publisher. Move on and find someone who does. (There was actually some profanity when it was told to me, but it certainly stuck with me!)

How important is social media to you as an author? For me, living across three continents, social media is a necessary evil. I don’t love it and I’m not good at it, but I can cheer on fellow authors in Australia, be a mentor to a school in the US and virtually join a chat in the UK from anywhere. That’s pretty amazing.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? If I can’t think of anything to write creatively, I revise something or critique someone else’s story or send out submissions.

How do you deal with rejection? I reject rejection! In my experience, publishers never actually use the word ‘rejection’. I decided early on that I wouldn’t believe that I or my story are ‘rejected’ when a publisher doesn’t take it. I work hard to find publishing houses that are a good fit for my project. But if they don’t agree, I move on.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Sweet, silly and side-splitting

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? I have read Are You My Mother? by P. D. Eastman so many times (I even bought the Spanish edition and I don’t speak Spanish) that I’d love to meet him. I’d ask him to explain to me what it is – the X factor, that thing, the special something – that makes a book really ‘good’? Are You My Mother? breaks a lot of today’s picture book rules, but it has certainly withstood the test of time.

BOOK BYTE

Arabella and the Magic Pencil

Written by Stephanie Ward, Illustrated by Shaney Hyde

Arabella is a beloved only child who has everything until her brother, Avery, arrives. While she loves him, it’s sometimes hard to like him. She spends her days creating marvellous things with her magic pencil, and ignoring him. But when he spoils her tea party, she decides drastic action is required and she erases him from her life. Oops! Can she get him back? Arabella and the Magic Pencil will appeal to any child with a new sibling and to caregivers who are supporting changing family dynamics.

Arabella and the Magic Pencil is available from ekbooks.org and wherever good books are sold.

 

Meet the Author: Inez Baranay

Inez’s top tip for aspiring authors: Write however you want to write. Make your own rules, find your own voice.

Inez Baranay was born in Naples, Italy, grew up in Sydney, Australia. She has published 12 books of fiction and non-fiction, and has lived in and taught creative writing in countries including India, Indonesia and the United States. Most recently Inez taught at the university in Canakkale, Turkey, on the shore of the Dardanelles. She now lives in Sydney.
To find out more about Inez and her writing, visit www.inezbaranay.com

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I couldn’t bear not to. I need those periods of immersion in imagination and language, to be making something, to be in that state of other-being. But why why why, it’s a mystery eventually; sometimes to need to write feels like a curse.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer? I can’t realistically imagine not being a writer. I’d have to be someone very different. A gardener? A painter? An outrageously wealthy heiress?

What was your toughest obstacle to becoming published? Waiting until the right publisher at the right moment turned up – it took a while.

How involved have you been in the development of your book? Did you have input into the cover? After the publisher (Transit Lounge) accepted the book they assigned an editor (Kate Goldsworthy) who was great for tidying up the manuscript and helping me solve remaining issues.

The publisher consulted me about the cover; several covers were suggested, then this one, and I immediately said Yes. The image gives me a good feeling.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? Writing itself. The solitude, the complete freedom. You make your own rules, invent your own way of working.

—the worst? The realities of financial poverty, the times it’s going badly and my whole life seems based on stupid delusion.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? Learn a trade by which to earn a living. When I started out there was an expectation that earning a living was possible from literary, independent writing.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? Nothing anyone could have told me would have made any difference, I suspect.

What’s the best advice you were ever given? A strangely difficult question: good advice in general seems to confirm what you already feel is true, so the best advice came from myself, to trust the instinct. (No general advice suits all situations.)

How important is social media to you as an author? Not at all, except sometimes as a place to lurk and see what’s going on in the world and how people talk about it.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? I don’t like that expression. Every creative endeavour has different phases, you can’t expect it always to be like it is when it feels like it’s flowing. Sometimes the writing doesn’t go well. Almost to the point of despair sometimes. Just keep going, try a different way, go for a walk, have a nap if you need to.

How do you deal with rejection? Pick myself up, dust myself off. Persist. Maybe feel horrible for a while then make up any interpretation of the rejection that makes me keep going.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? Experimental. Imaginative. Precise.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? Hm, that would have to be the subject of the biography I am currently writing, Sasha Soldatow, who died in 2006; he was my first editor, and wrote brilliantly, but not enough, who had talent to burn but, by all accounts, was destroyed by alcohol and pills, or by whatever made him turn to them rather than to writing.

BOOK BYTE

Turn Left at Venus

Inez Baranay

 

 

They were two little girls on a very big boat.
In the 1930s, Ada and Leyla meet as children on a boat bringing migrants from Old Europe to the New World. They talk of seeing kangaroos yet end up living miles apart from each other in suburban Sydney. Their separations are often lengthy but their friendship endures across continents and
decades and is a thread in this haunting story of writing, relationships and ageing.
Ada (A.L. Ligeti) becomes an author, searching for a Utopian world, exploring aspects of patriarchy and gender in her groundbreaking feminist science fiction novel called Turn Left at Venus. That novel and its sequels are celebrated and much discussed by generations of fans. Memory and imagination fold seamlessly into one another as Ada keeps moving on,
from relationships and places, living in hotels and rental spaces
in Kings Cross, San Francisco, Ubud and elsewhere.
Baranay’s emotionally resonant portrait of the solitary and artistic
life, lived adventurously across space and time, triumphantly
celebrates the singularity of being, of age, of imagination, and
of the ‘getting ready’ for the ending that life demands.

The book is available from https://transitlounge.com.au/shop/tun-left-venus/

 

Meet the Author: SL Lim

S L Lim was born in Singapore and moved to Sydney as a child. They don’t eat animals. They hate heterosexuality, the gender binary, the energy industry, other industries, racism, sexism, progressive politics as an aesthetic/lifestyle signifier as opposed to a material engagement with injustice and power, including in one’s own life; getting up in the morning, the requirement to exchange one’s labour in return for a wage, and people who casually mention they are better than you. They like stickers, food, pretty yet inexpensive stationery, mathematical approaches to vegan baking, direct action, quiet people with an ironical yet wise approach to life, noisy apparent assholes with good hearts, queerness, tendentious takes, mutual care, mutual accountability and mutual aid. They like to read blender reviews online where the reviewer obviously had totally insane expectations for the blender. Sunsets are beautiful. Borders are violence. Vaginal orgasm is a mass hysterical survival response.

AUTHOR INSIGHT

Why do you write? I would like to create beautiful things of lasting value which is independent of my existence as a person.

What’s the best aspect of your writing life? The pleasure of naming a phenomenon, concept or experience that went previously unarticulated.

—the worst? Oscillations between megalomania and self-abnegation.

What would you do differently if you were starting out now as a writer? Start earlier, work harder.

What do you wish you’d been told before you set out to become an author? In terms of the writing: there is no secret. Do the work and keep doing it. In terms of getting published: treat this as its own skill quite separate from the writing itself.

What’s the best advice you were ever given? Regard human systems as comprehensible and problems as solvable.

What’s your top tip for aspiring authors? Write. Read very carefully. Hang out with dead people. Keep writing. Be hard on your own work. Find persons whose judgement you trust and make use of their intelligence and kindness.

How important is social media to you as an author? I regret cruelty and loss and time and holding on to friendship and to love as it curdled into indifference but I regret NOT ONE SECOND of the time I have spent on the internet.

Do you experience ‘writer’s block’ and if so, how do you overcome it? By reminding myself the obstacles that exist to prevent me from writing today will still exist tomorrow so if I don’t write today I probably won’t write tomorrow and this will go on for a while and then I’ll die.

How do you deal with rejection? Lying face down on the carpet. One aspect I struggled with during years of feeling like a waste of space, a pool of sentient mush dissolving on the bathmat, was the realisation everyone gets rejected, a lot. If I were a brilliant misunderstood genius I would probably be getting a lot of rejections. And if I were a self-deluding hack… the exact same thing would be occurring. There was no way of evaluating which particular universe I was living in.

Come to that, I still don’t know. Am I any good? Are you? Is what? Are unicorns hollow? Just because a question can be formulated grammatically doesn’t mean it has an answer. The trouble with this approach is it tends towards the conclusion literally nothing means anything. This isn’t untrue, exactly, but it doesn’t help you get out of bed, and I need all the help that I can get.

So maybe a better approach is to remember publication is not the only market of merit; there is a huge amount of structural unfairness and just randomness. But there are also ways you can improve your chances, like getting better at your craft and submitting your work to lots of publishers and agents.

My advice, if you were asking for it, is: do the thing you’ve got to do, because you do, and… well, that’s it, really. Good luck.

In three words, how would you describe your writing? It’s getting better.

If you had the chance to spend an hour with any writer of your choice, living or dead, who would it be and what would you most like them to tell you about living a writing life? Kim Stanley Robinson. I want to go hiking with him and either talk about Buddhism or not talk at all but simultaneously look at things like lichens and go ‘hmm’ so we understand we both appreciate this sublime phenomenon and are experiencing it in a manner both collective and solitary.

BOOK BYTE

Real Differences

by SL Lim

This is a story of a friendship so connected that without it one is not whole but lost.

Middle-class, clever and white, Nick is a child of privilege while his best friend Andie is the daughter of Indo-Chinese refugees. Despite their very different backgrounds, they share a conviction they can change the world for the better.

At the outset, Nick is pushing papers in a dead-end job while Andie is embarking on a secular crusade against world poverty. This generates conflict with her white husband Benjamin, who feels that Australians should come first. Meanwhile, Andie’s cousin, the teenage Tony is burdened by his parents’ traumatic past and impossible expectations. To their dismay, he finds solace in  radical faith.

S.L. Lim acutely captures the dreams and disaffections of a millennial generation. Real Differences is an emotionally resonant novel about idealism, ethical ambition, and love, filled with unforgettable characters. It ultimately asks us the most important question of all: What is our life for?

Sales site link

https://transitlounge.com.au/shop/real-differences/

Author website

https://twitter.com/slwritesbooks